IMG credits: Google

While Chrome was initially supposed to block certain media files for security reasons, including images, videos and music from October 2020, Google has decided to postpone its schedule globally.

If you go online with Chrome, rest assured: you won’t need to change software on October 7. Google’s plan to block certain content, which is nevertheless accessible on the web, with its web browser has been postponed, at least in terms of the provisions most visible to internet users. The default blocking of certain media files was originally planned from October 6, with Chrome 86.

What are we talking about? This whole affair affects mixed content, that is, unsecured content that loads onto secure pages. At the very beginning of the year, Google presented the timetable it intended to follow to progressively neutralize content that does not meet minimum standards in terms of computer security.

What we are talking about here is whether or not a layer of protection is applied to what is sent to the Internet user: the web pages, but also the various content they contain. This protection is done using an encryption method and, when it is in place, the page is said to be in HTTPS (HyperText Transfer Protocol Secure ), and not in simple form HTTP.

You have inevitably been confronted with HTTPS, and fortunately: it is thanks to this protection that you can connect to your bank account, your webmail or your usual merchant with a good level of security. This helps prevent a malicious third party from virtually standing between your PC and the site you are visiting to see what you are doing and take sensitive information.

 

 However, there are cases where the web page, although provided in HTTPS to the Internet user, still contains content in HTTP, that is to say without any encryption layer. This is exactly why we talk about mixed content: they can be found next to other files which are loaded securely. And it's those insecure files that Google Chrome wants to keep away.
The symbol of a secure connection, a closed padlock. // Source: Sean MacEntee

However, there are cases where the web page, although provided in HTTPS to the Internet user, still contains content in HTTP, that is to say without any encryption layer. This is exactly why we talk about mixed content: they can be found next to other files which are loaded securely. And it’s those insecure files that Google Chrome wants to keep away.

Initially, the start of the measure was to occur in March 2020, with Chrome 81 – the current version is Chrome 85. But in April, the American company changed its mind: finally, the entire detailed schedule in February was shifted by at least two versions each time. For example, the planned arrangements with Chrome 86, due out October 6 , won’t arrive until Chrome 88/89, at best.

It was then a question, with Chrome 86, of including more restrictive rules with regard to files that are not properly secured. Clearly, this would have had the effect of blocking by default certain images, videos or music not being delivered in HTTPS.

The previous versions of Chrome (82, 83, 84 and 85) were to do the same for other file types, such as executables (.exe), packages (.apk), archives (.zip), images disk (.iso), Word documents (.dox) or even PDFs. Here too, Google has decided to shift warnings and blockings by at least two versions of Google Chrome.

IMG credits: Google

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